Tag Archives: dog owners

Sam Scares His Human

Image
Sam Scares His Human

Sam thinks the human tradition of leaving food gifts at the front door is weird, but he’s not complaining.  He’d never tasted honey whole wheat bread until he found a sweet offering in front of the renter’s front door and gobbled down the entire loaf.

Sam was sucking up the last few crumbs of the loaf when his human found him and panicked. Sam knows that humans scare easily. And he felt bad about scaring his human, but not too bad. The honey whole wheat bread was delicious-nothing like his dog food.

Sam belched and laid down on the grass. The lump of bread in his belly was growing, he couldn’t get up off the ground. This made his human really scared.

Now Sam has observed that when  humans get scared they grab their cell phone. He isn’t sure why, but it seems to make them feel better.  It worked this time, because after looking at the cell phone for a few minutes, his human smiled and threw the ball for him…Sam got up off the ground for that.

Sam thinks humans should stop leaving food at the front door, but not anytime soon. He wants to try honey whole wheat bread again.

Sam, you sweet fella…..

Sam and Routine Gr-r-r

Standard

Sam can tell time, well…..sort of.

Every afternoon at four o’clock Sam gets hungry. His regular dinnertime is five-his humans keep him on a strict eating schedule-but Sam’s tummy clock tells him he needs to eat.

Sam finds his eating routine irritating and he uses his keenest canine skills to convince his humans he should eat early.

At first, he tries moaning sadly, but this only makes his humans roll their eyes. Then he tries the ” happy dog face” which his humans tend to enjoy, but they still won’t feed him before five.

Growling at the humans really doesn’t work; it just gets him in trouble and sent to bed.

Sam has resorted to pouting, but that’s boring plus no one notices.

Sam poutsPoor Sam thinks routines are mean. If he ever meets a routine, he’ll be sure to bite it.

He ‘s heard that routines can be broken; he’d like to find a way to break his eating routine, but he doesn’t know where his humans keep the darn thing.

Sam’s Selfie

Standard

 

iPhoto Library sam's selfie

Sam now has a selfie photo. What’s surprising is that he didn’t smile for the camera…… he does that you know.

The other day I took him to the vet to get his nails clipped. When we walked into the office, Sam put his front paws on the receptionist’s counter so he could get a good look around.  As soon as he saw the receptionist-I KID YOU NOT- he gave her a big smile. She squealed with delight and ran over to smother him with hugs.

Sam obviously has the nail technician trained because when she brought him back after his nail trim she frowned and said, “He didn’t smile today.” The poor woman was obviously disappointed that she had missed out. Sam, you big dog.

Sam thinks humans are predictable……but nice.    He plans to take another selfie soon, but first he needs to practice his smile a bit more.

 

 

Sam and His Twin Have a Reunion

Standard

Sam hadn’t seen his twin in four months. Now Sam and his brother, Kingston, were having their first family reunion.  Typical of family reunions, the anticipation of their seeing each other was probably more exciting than the actual event.

Sam had no idea he was going to see his brother. He didn’t primp, get a haircut or try to lose a bunch of weight, like humans often do prior to reunions.  He thought he was just cruising along with his ears blowing in the wind, as we drove to Kingston’s house.   When my son and I saw the Sam look-a-like dog in the front yard we knew we were at the right place.

At first the puppies were curiously excited to see another, but within a couple of minutes, their play changed into a new level of intensity…one that was hard to define. Was this happiness or irritation?

Perhaps like old relatives catching up at a reunion, Kingston and Sam were remembering back to earlier times…

Kingston: “I remember how Sam chased his tail and knocked over our water bowl.  Boy was that stupid.”

Sam:  “I hope Kingston doesn’t bite me on the ear…he always bit me when he was mad.”

Both dogs played rough, chased and nipped at one another.  Maybe that’s what happens at family reunions.

I remember one family reunion when my five year old cousin fell from the top of a twenty foot high slide.  Fortunately, he wasn’t hurt, but to this day, we don’t know what caused him to fall.  Did he get a good shove from a revengeful second cousin once removed or a disgruntled third cousin on his father’s mother’s side?  We’ll probably never know…

Our family reunions always involved “incidents.”  Like the time one of my cousins told grandma that her third cousin Hubert had kicked the bucket the year before.  My family had a strict policy of never telling grandma if anybody in the family had died.  Grandma’s side of the family had the longevity genes so she just kept outliving all her relatives.

If she asked why someone was missing from the family reunion, we’d lie through our teeth telling her the relative was sick or on vacation….a long vacation.

When grandma finally died at 98 years old we all wondered if she really knew she’d died or maybe thought she was on vacation…a long vacation.

At this one particular reunion, my cousin slipped up big time and answered grandma’s question truthfully; her third cousin Hubert had died.   Poor grandma took it so hard she refused to eat dessert.  The family reunion ended abruptly that year.

Sam and Kingston continued to nip and play rough, but maybe it was to be expected. After all, this was a family reunion….

.

Samuel or Sammy?

Standard

Sam is 4 months old now and going to school…not literally, but we’re teaching him lots of new things every day.  He responds to commands such as sit, stay and lie down now, but he’s still a little shaky on come.  He can sit for a full minute when I set down his food dish.  Saliva drools down his mouth while he waits…but he does wait until I tell him to eat.

Sam’s two biggest temptations in life are people and food. He especially forgets everything he’s learned when people are present.  So, we create mock training situations for Sam to learn his commands with friends and family standing around.  If you come over to our house, be prepared to participate in Sam’s latest lessons…it really does take a village to raise a puppy.

At a recommendation of a friend, we bought Sam a special collar to help him not pull so much when he’s walked.  Amazingly, the collar has unique power over him.  With the collar around his neck he becomes Samuel- a quiet, obedient and submissive dog.  If Samuel could talk, he’s say, “Oh, master, your wish is my command.” But when that collar comes off, he’s Sammy who might retort, “Heck no, I’m not listening to you!”

When I tell the kids stories about his latest lessons, they always ask, “Was that Samuel or Sammy?”  If someone overheard us they’d think we had two dogs instead of one dog with two personalities!

DogTV for Dog Boredom?

Standard

 

I regret to inform the world that my dog will not be watching Time Warner’s new cable channel DogTV which was launched this past Monday.  To be perfectly honest, I don’t own a dog, but if I did she wouldn’t be watching the channel.  Supposedly DogTV will be the ideal baby sitter for Fido.

“Loving our dogs so much, we feel guilty when we leave them home alone,” said Gilad Neumann, CEO of DogTV.  DogTV provides customized television entertainment while the rest of the family is away at work or too busy to play.’

Our family has owned a couple of dogs over the years.  Molly, the best dog in the whole world, as my family liked to call her,(and Sam’s predecessor) was by far one of our favorite dogs.  Molly was part Blue Tick Heeler, Cattle Dog and Labrador retriever; at least that was our veterinarian’s best guess.

Molly was a year old stray when we adopted her. She was a bit wild from living on the streets and so every time we opened the back door, she bolted down the alley and around the block. We chased her almost every day for six months straight.

We eventually moved to a new house near a large wooded area which satisfied Molly’s wild streak.  She roamed the 17 acre woods next to our home chasing squirrels to her heart’s content and “herded” our kids when they were in our backyard.  She barked at the crows circling overhead who responded by dive bombing and cawing at her.   She stood her ground with those crows, guarding us with her life.

Molly was never bored or lonely. She entertained herself running through the woods, chasing the squirrels and barking at crows.  For the most part, Molly didn’t need us except to feed and water her and to give her a pat on head with a “Molly, you’re the best dog in the world,” compliment.  No doubt her breed contributed to her independent nature. Many dogs aren’t outdoor types or quite as independent.

DogTV might be the solution for some dog’s boredom, but Molly would never put up with sitting around watching television when there were crows to bark at and squirrels to chase. She might even growl at us if we  mentioned it to her, perhaps it might remind her of the crows circling overhead.